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Dan Ariely quotes (showing 1-30 of 235)

“individuals are honest only to the extent that suits them (including their desire to please others)”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“But suppose we are nothing more than the sum of our first, naive, random behaviors. What then?”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“To summarize, using money to motivate people can be a double-edged sword. For tasks that require cognitive ability, low to moderate performance-based incentives can help. But when the incentive level is very high, it can command too much attention and thereby distract the person’s mind with thoughts about the reward. This can create stress and ultimately reduce the level of performance.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“We all want explanations for why we behave as we do and for the ways the world around us functions. Even when our feeble explanations have little to do with reality. We’re storytelling creatures by nature, and we tell ourselves story after story until we come up with an explanation that we like and that sounds reasonable enough to believe. And when the story portrays us in a more glowing and positive light, so much the better.”
Dan Ariely, The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
“we usually think of ourselves as sitting the driver's seat, with ultimate control over the decisions we made and the direction our life takes; but, alas, this perception has more to do with our desires-with how we want to view ourselves-than with reality”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“Ownership is not limited to material things. It can also apply to points of view. Once we take ownership of an idea — whether it’s about politics or sports — what do we do? We love it perhaps more than we should. We prize it more than it is worth. And most frequently, we have trouble letting go of it because we can’t stand the idea of its loss. What are we left with then? An ideology — rigid and unyielding.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“One percent of people will always be honest and never steal," the locksmith said. "Another one percent will always be dishonest and always try to pick your lock and steal your television. And the rest will be honest as long as the conditions are right - but if they are tempted enough, they'll be dishonest too. Locks won't protect you from the thieves, who can get in your house if they really want to. They will only protect you from the mostly honest people who might be tempted to try your door if it had no lock".”
Dan Ariely, The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
“Giving up on our long-term goals for immediate gratification, my friends, is procrastination.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“The more cashless our society becomes, the more our moral compass slips.”
Dan Ariely, The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
“Standard economics assumes that we are rational... But, as the results presented in this book (and others) show, we are far less rational in our decision making... Our irrational behaviors arevneither random nor senseless- they are systematic and predictable. We all make the same types of mistakes over and over, because of he basic wiring of our brains.-pg. 239”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“that when given the opportunity, many honest people will cheat.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“one that we are just beginning to understand- is that trust, once eroded, is very hard to restore.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“human beings are inherently social and trusting animals.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“...[D]ivision of labor, in my mind, is one of the dangers of work-based technology. Modern IT infrastructure allows us to break projects into very small, discrete parts and assign each person to do only one of the many parts. In so doing, companies run the risk of taking away employees' sense of the big picture, purpose, and sense of completion.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“A few years ago, for instance, the AARP asked some lawyers if they would offer less expensive services to needy retirees, at something like $30 an hour. The lawyers said no. Then the program manager from AARP had a brilliant idea: he asked the lawyers if they would offer free services to needy retirees. Overwhelmingly, the lawyers said yes. What was going on here? How could zero dollars be more attractive than $30? When money was mentioned, the lawyers used market norms and found the offer lacking, relative to their market salary. When no money was mentioned they used social norms and were willing to volunteer their time. Why didn’t they just accept the $30, thinking of themselves as volunteers who received $30? Because once market norms enter our considerations, the social norms depart.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“But because human being tend to focus on short-term benefits and our own immediate needs, such tragedies of the commons occur frequently .”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“It is very difficult to make really big,
important, life-changing decisions because we are all susceptible
to a formidable array of decision biases. There are more of them
than we realize, and they come to visit us more often than we
like to admit.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Maybe we feel meaning only when we deal with something bigger. Perhaps we hope that someone else, especially someone important to us, will ascribe value to what we've produced? Maybe we need the illusion that our work might one day matter to many people. That it might be of some value in the big, broad world out there [...]? Most likely it is all of these. But fundamentally, I think that almost any aspect of meaning [...] can be sufficient to drive our behaviour. As long as we are doing something that is somewhat connected to our self image, it can fuel our motivation and get us to work much harder.”
Dan Ariely, The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
“That’s a lesson we can all learn: the more we have, the more we want. And the only cure is to break the cycle of relativity.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“The danger of expecting nothing is that, in the end, it might be all we'll get.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“Without constant suspicion, we can get more out of our exchanges with others while spending less time making sure that others will fulfill their promise to us.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“People are willing to work free, and they are willing to work for a reasonable wage; but offer them just a small payment and they will walk away.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“feeling so far is that standardized testing and performance-based salaries are likely to push education from social norms to market norms. The United States already spends more money per student than any other Western society. Would it be wise to add more money? The same consideration applies to testing: we are already testing very frequently, and more testing is unlikely to improve the quality of education. I suspect that one answer lies in the realm of social norms. As we learned in our experiments, cash will take you only so far—social norms are the forces that can make a difference in the long run. Instead of focusing the attention of the teachers, parents, and kids on test scores, salaries, and competition, it might be better to instill in all of us a sense of purpose, mission, and pride in education. To do this we certainly can’t take the path of market norms. The Beatles proclaimed some time ago that you “Can’t Buy Me Love” and this also applies to the love of learning—you can’t buy it; and if you try, you might chase it away.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“...[T]he distance Boston drivers generally maintain from the car in front of them is visible only with a good microscope.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Resisting temptation and instilling self-control are general human goals, and repeatedly failing to achieve them is a source of much of our misery.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“recognizing our shortcomings is a crucial first step on the path to making better decisions, creating better societies, and fixing our institutions.”
Dan Ariely, The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone--Especially Ourselves
“There are many examples to show that people will work more for a cause than for cash.”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“...if I pay you lots of money to see reality in a certain way, you will.”
Dan Ariely
“If we all make systematic mistakes in our decisions, then why not develop new strategies, tools, and methods to help us make better decisions and improve our overall well-being? That's exactly the meaning of free lunches- the idea that there are tools, methods, and policies that can help all of us make better decisions and as a consequence achieve what we desire-pg. 241”
Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
“A substantial amount of research over the past decade has reinforced the idea that although internal happiness can deviate from its "resting state" in reaction to life events, it usually returns toward its baseline over time.”
Dan Ariely

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