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John Newton quotes (showing 1-30 of 35)

“I am not what I ought to be, I am not what I want to be, I am not what I hope to be in another world; but still I am not what I once used to be, and by the grace of God I am what I am”
John Newton
“Although my memory's fading, I remember two things very clearly: I am a great sinner and Christ is a great Savior.”
John Newton, Amazing Grace
“I am still in the land of the dying; I shall be in the land of the living soon. (his last words)”
John Newton
“This is faith: a renouncing of everything we are apt to call our own and relying wholly upon the blood, righteousness and intercession of Jesus.”
John Newton
“Amazing grace! how sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me!
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind but now i see.”
John Newton, Amazing Grace
tags: hymn
“God sometimes does His work with gentle drizzle, not storms.”
John Newton, Amazing Grace
“We can easily manage if we will only take, each day, the burden appointed to it. But the load will be too heavy for us if we carry yesterday's burden over again today, and then add the burden of the morrow before we are required to bear it.”
John Newton
“Thou art coming to a King, large petitions with thee bring, for His grace and power are such none can ever ask too much.”
John Newton
“If we seem to get no good by attempting to draw near to Him, we may be sure we will get none by keeping away from Him.”
John Newton
“If two angels were to receive at the same moment a commission from God, one to go down and rule earth’s grandest empire, the other to go and sweep the streets of its meanest village, it would be a matter of entire indifference to each which service fell to his lot, the post of ruler or the post of scavenger; for the joy of the angels lies only in obedience to God’s will, and with equal joy they would lift a Lazarus in his rags to Abraham’s bosom, or be a chariot of fire to carry an Elijah home.”
John Newton
“I endeavored to renounce society, that I might avoid temptation. But it was a poor religion; so far as it prevailed, only tended to make me gloomy, stupid, unsociable, and useless.”
John Newton
“The midsummer sun shines but dim, The fields strive in vain to look gay; But when I am happy in Him December's as pleasant as May.”
John Newton
“Whoever is truly humbled — will not be easily angry, nor harsh or critical of others. He will be compassionate and tender to the infirmities of his fellow-sinners, knowing that if there is a difference — it is grace alone which has made it! He knows that he has the seeds of every evil in his own heart. And under all trials and afflictions — he will look to the hand of the Lord, and lay his mouth in the dust, acknowledging that he suffers much less than his iniquities have deserved.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“Afflictions quicken us to prayer. It is a pity it should be so; but experience testifies, that a long course of ease and prosperity, without painful changes—has an unhappy tendency to make us cold and formal in our secret worship. But troubles rouse our spirits, and constrain us to call upon the Lord in good earnest—when we feel a need of that help which we only can have from his almighty arm. Afflictions are useful, and in a degree necessary, to keep alive in us—a conviction of the vanity and unsatisfying nature of the present world, and all its enjoyments; to remind us that this world is not our rest, and to call our thoughts upwards, where our true treasure is, and where our heart ought to be. When things go on much to our wish, our hearts are too prone to say, "It is good to be here!”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“You have liberty to cast all your cares upon him who cares for you. By one hour's intimate access to the throne of grace, where the Lord causes his glory to pass before the soul that seeks him — you may acquire more true spiritual knowledge and comfort, than by a day or a week's converse with the best of men, or the most studious perusal of many folios.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“Self-righteousness can feed upon doctrines—as well as upon works!”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“If you once love Him, you will study to please Him.”
John Newton
“Of all people who engage in controversy, we, who are called Calvinists, are most expressly bound by our own principles to the exercise of gentleness and moderation.”
John Newton
“God could have over-ruled every difficulty in your way, had he seen it expedient. But he is pleased to show you, that you depend not upon men—but upon himself; and that, notwithstanding your situation, may exclude you from some advantages in point of outward means. He who has begun a good work in you, is able to carry it on, in defiance of all seeming hindrances, and make all things (even those which have the most unfavorable appearances) work together for your good.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“I wish you may profit by my experience. Alas, how much time have I lost and wasted, which, had I been wise—I would have devoted to reading and studying the Bible! But my evil heart obstructs the dictates of my judgment, I often feel a reluctance to read this book of books, and a disposition to hew out broken cisterns which afford me no water, while the fountain of living waters are close within my reach!”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“It is a great thing to die; and, when flesh and a heart fail, to have God for the strength of our hearts, and our portion forever. I know whom I have believed, and he is able to keep that which I have committed against that great day. Hence forth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the lord, the righteous judge, shall give me that day.”
John Newton
“But that we are so totally depraved, is a truth which no one ever truly learned by being only told it.”
John Newton, Select Letters of John Newton
“Let us chide our cold unfeeling hearts and pray for a coal of fire from the heavenly altar to send us home in a flame of love to him who has thus loved us.”
John Newton
“But though my disease is grievous, it is not desperate; I have a gracious and infallible Physician. I shall not die — but live, and declare the works of the Lord.”
John Newton, Select Letters of John Newton
“the chief and grand means of edification, without which all other helps will disappoint us, and prove like clouds without water—are the Bible and prayer—the Word of grace and the Throne of grace.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“Who is there who speaks and it happens—unless the Lord has ordained it?" Lamentations 3:37”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“The appearance of an angel from heaven could add nothing to the certainty of the declarations he has already put into our hands.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“The wisdom that is from above, is not only pure, but also peaceable and gentle; and the lack of these qualifications, like the dead fly in the jar of ointment, will spoil the fragrance and efficacy of our labors. If we act in a wrong spirit—we shall bring little glory to God; do little good to our fellow creatures; and procure neither honor nor comfort to ourselves! If you can be content with showing your wit, and gaining the laugh on your side—you have an easy task!”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton
“Savior, if of Zion’s city I through grace a member am; Let the world deride or pity, I will glory in thy name Fading is the worldling’s pleasure, All his boasted pomp and show; Solid joys and lasting treasure, None but Zion’s children know.”
John Newton, Olney Hymns
“The weapons of our warfare, and which alone are powerful to break down the strongholds of error, are not carnal, but spiritual. They are arguments fairly drawn from Scripture and experience, and enforced by such a mild address, as may persuade our readers, that, whether we can convince them or not—we wish well to their souls, and contend only for the truth's sake. If we can satisfy them that we act upon these motives, our point is half gained; they will be more disposed to consider calmly what we offer; and if they should still dissent from our opinions, they will be constrained to approve our intentions.”
John Newton, The Letters of John Newton

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