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Boethius quotes (showing 1-30 of 48)

“Nothing is miserable unless you think it so; and on the other hand, nothing brings happiness unless you are content with it.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Who would give a law to lovers? Love is unto itself a higher law.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
tags: love
“Nunc fluens facit tempus,
nunc stans facit aeternitatum.

(The now that passes produces time, the now that remains produces eternity.)”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Balance out the good things and the bad that have happened in your life and you will have to acknowledge that you are still way ahead. You are unhappy because you have lost those things in which you took pleasure? But you can also take comfort in the likelihood that what is now making you miserable will also pass away.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Indeed, the condition of human nature is just this; man towers above the rest of creation so long as he realizes his own nature, and when he forgets it, he sinks lower than the beasts. For other living things to be ignorant of themselves, is natural; but for man it is a defect.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Love binds people too, in matrimony's sacred bonds where chaste lovers are met, and friends cement their trust and friendship. How happy is mankind, if the love that orders the stars above rules, too, in your hearts.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“As far as possible, join faith to reason.”
Boethius
“If I have fully diagnosed the cause and nature of your condition, you are wasting away in pining and longing for your former good fortune. It is the loss of this which, as your imagination works upon you, has so corrupted your mind. I know the many disguises of that monster, Fortune, and the extent to which she seduces with friendship the very people she is striving to cheat, until she overwhelms them with unbearable grief at the suddenness of her desertion”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Contemplate the extent and stability of the heavens, and then at last cease to admire worthless things.”
Boethius
“All fortune is good fortune; for it either rewards, disciplines, amends, or punishes, and so is either useful or just.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Wretched men cringe before tyrants who have no power, the victims of their trivial hopes and fears. They do not realise that anger is hopeless, fear is pointless and desire all a delusion. He whose heart is fickle is not his own master, has thrown away his shield, deserted his post, and he forges the links of the chain that holds him.”
Boethius
“And it is because you don't know the end and purpose of things that you think the wicked and the criminal have power and happiness.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“One's virtue is all that one truly has, because it is not imperiled by the vicissitudes of fortune.”
Boethius
“Men who give up the common goal of all things that exist, thereby cease to exist themselves. Some may perhaps think it strange that we say that wicked men, who form the majority of men, do not exist; but that is how it is. I am not trying to deny the wickedness of the wicked; what I do deny is that their existence is absolute and complete existence. Just as you might call a corpse a dead man, but couldn't simply call it a man, so I would agree that the wicked are wicked, but could not agree that they have unqualified existence.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“So it follows that those who have reason have freedom to will or not to will, although this freedom is not equal in all of them. [...] human souls are more free when they persevere in the contemplation of the mind of God, less free when they descend to the corporeal, and even less free when they are entirely imprisoned in earthly flesh and blood.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Man is so constituted that he then only excels other things when he knows himself.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“He is in no real danger. He merely suffers from a lethargy, a sickness that is common among the depressed. He has forgotten who he really is, but he will recover, for he used to know me, and all I have to do is cloud the mist that beclouds his vision.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“The greatest misery in adverse fortune is once to have been happy.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Human perversity, then, makes divisions of that which by nature is one and simple, and in attempting to obtain part of something which has no parts, succeeds in getting neither the part- which is nothing- nor the whole, which they are not interested in.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule the mind is their subject.”
Boethius
“So dry your tears. Fortune has not yet turned her hatred against all your blessings. The storm has not yet broken upon you with too much violence. Your anchors are holding firm and they permit you both comfort in the present, and hope in the future.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“No man is rich who shakes and groans
Convinced that he needs more.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Oh teach the mind t' aetherial heights to rise,
And view familiar, in its native skies,
Thy source of good; thy splendor to descry,
And on thy self, undazled, fix her eye.
Oh quicken this dull mass of mortal clay;
Shine through the soul, and drive its clouds away!
For thou art Light. In thee the righteous find
Calm rest, and soft serenity of mind;
Thee they regard alone; to thee they tend;
At once our great original and end,
At once our means, our end, our guide, our way,
Our utmost bound, and our eternal stay!”
Boethius
“...Whose souls, albeit in a cloudy memory, yet seek back their good, but, like drunk men, know not the road home.”
Boethius
“For in all adversity of fortune the worst sort of misery is to have been happy.”
Boethius
“But by the same logic as men become just through the possession of justice, or wise through the possession of wisdom, so those who possess divinity necessary become divine. Each happy individual is therefore divine. While only God is so by nature, as many as you like may become so by participation.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“And no renown can render you well-known:
For if you think that fame can lengthen life
By mortal famousness immortalized,
The day will come that takes your fame as well,
And there a second death for you awaits.”
Boethius
“There is no danger: he is suffering from drowsiness, that disease which attacks so many minds which have been deceived.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“And so sovereign Providence has often produced a remarkable effect--evil men making other evil men good. For some, when they think they suffer injustice at the hands of the worst of men, burn with hatred for evil men, and being eager to be different from those they hate, have reformed and become virtuous. It is only the power of God to which evils may also be good, when by their proper use He elicits some good result.”
Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy
“Thou knowest that these things which I say are true, and that I was never delighted in my own praise, for the secret of a good conscience is in some sort diminished, when by declaring what he hath done, a man receiveth the reward of fame.”
Boethius

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