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Edgar Allan Poe quotes (showing 121-150 of 567)

“Art is to look at not to criticize.”
Edgar Allan Poe
“A million candles have burned themselves out. Still I read on. (Montresor)”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Cask of Amontillado
“True! - nervous - very, very nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad?”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings
“I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of golden sand-
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep- while I weep!”
Edgar Allan Poe
“There is no beauty without some strangeness.”
Edgar Allan Poe
“Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes.
Why preyest thou thus upon the poet's heart,
Vulture, whose wings are dull realities?
How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise?
Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering
To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,
Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing?
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car?
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?
Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood,
The Elfin from the green grass, and from me
The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree?”
Edgar Allan Poe
“We had always dwelled together, beneath a tropical sun, in the Valley of the Many Colored Grass.”
Edgar Allan Poe
tags: love
“Even for those to whom life and death are equal jests. There are some things that are still held in respect.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Murders in the Rue Morgue: The Dupin Tales
“In our endeavors to recall to memory something long forgotten, we often find ourselves upon the very verge of remembrance, without being able, in the end, to remember.”
Edgar Allan Poe, Ligeia
“I call to mind flatness and dampness; and then all is madness - the madness of a memory which busies itself among forbidden things.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Pit and the Pendulum
“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven and Other Poems
“...the agony of my soul found vent in one loud, long and final scream of despair.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Pit and the Pendulum
“The depth lies in the valleys where we seek her, and not upon the mountain-tops where she is found.”
Edgar Allan Poe
“And have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the sense? --now, I say, there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well, too. It was the beating of the old man's heart. It increased my fury, as the beating of a drum stimulates the soldier into courage.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings
“Who has not, a hundred times, found himself committing a vile or silly action for no other reason than because he knows he should not? Have we not a perpetual inclination, in the teeth of our best judgement, to violate that which is Law, merely because we understand it to be such?”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat
“...is a pale desert of gigantic water-lilies. They sigh one unto the other in that solitude. And stretch towards the heaven their long and ghastly necks. And nod to and fro their everlasting heads. And there is an indistinct murmur which cometh out from among them like the rushing of subterrene water. And they sigh unto the other... And the tall primeval trees rock eternally hither and thither with a crashing and mighty sound. And from their high summits, one by one, drop everlasting dews. And at the roots strange poisonous flowers lie writhing in perturbed slumber. And overhead, with a rustling loud noise, the gray clouds rush westwardly forever, until they roll, a cataract, over the fiery wall of the horizon...”
Edgar Allan Poe
“But as in ethics, evil is a consequence of good, so in fact, out of joy is sorrow born. Either the memory of past bliss is the anguish of today, or the agonies which are have their origin in the ecstasies which might have been.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Short Tales
“...A change fell upon all things. Strange brilliant flowers, star-shaped, burst out upon the trees where no flowers had been before. The tints of the green carpet deepened; and when, one by one, the white daisies shrank away, there sprang up, in place of them, ten by ten of the ruby-red asphodel. And life arose in our paths; for the tall flamingo hitherto unseen, with all gay glowing birds, flaunted his scarlet plumage before us. The golden and silver fish haunted the river...”
Edgar Allan Poe
“In other words, I believed, and still do believe, that truth, is frequently of its own essence, superficial, and that, in many cases, the depth lies more in the abysses where we seek her, than in the actual situations wherein she may be found.”
Edgar Allan Poe
“And now have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the senses?”
Edgar Allan Poe
“There are chords in the hearts of the most reckless which cannot be touched without emotion, even by the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there are matters of which no jest can be made.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Masque of the Red Death
“Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!”
Edgar Allan Poe
“O, Times! O, Manners! It is my opinion
That you are changing sadly your dominion
I mean the reign of manners hath long ceased,
For men have none at all, or bad at least;
And as for times, altho' 'tis said by many
The "good old times" were far the worst of any,
Of which sound Doctrine I believe each tittle
Yet still I think these worst a little.

I've been a thinking -isn't that the phrase?-
I like your Yankee words and Yankee ways -
I've been a thinking, whether it were best
To Take things seriously, Or all in jest”
Edgar Allan Poe, Poetry, Tales and Selected Essays
“I heed not that my earthly lot
Hath - little of Earth in it -
That years of love have been forgot
In the hatred of a minute: -
I mourn not that the desolate
Are happier, sweet, than I,
But that you sorrow for my fate
Who am a passer by.”
Edgar Allan Poe
“And the Raven, never flitting, Still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas Just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming Of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamplight o'er him streaming Throws his shadow on the floor, And my soul from out that shadow, That lies floating on the floor, Shall be lifted - nevermore.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven and Other Poems
“I am above the weakness of seeking to establish a sequence of cause and effect, between the disaster and the atrocity.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat
“There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Masque of the Red Death
“To muse for long unwearied hours with my attention riveted to some frivolous device upon the margin, or in the typography of a book — to become absorbed for the better part of a summer's day in a quaint shadow falling aslant upon the tapestry, or upon the floor — to lose myself for an entire night in watching the steady flame of a lamp, or the embers of a fire — to dream away whole days over the perfume of a flower — to repeat monotonously some common word, until the sound, by dint of frequent repetition, ceased to convey any idea whatever to the mind — to lose all sense of motion or physical existence in a state of absolute bodily quiescence long and obstinately persevered in — Such were a few of the most common and least pernicious vagaries induced by a condition of the mental faculties, not, indeed, altogether unparalleled, but certainly bidding defiance to any thing like analysis or explanation.”
Edgar Allan Poe, Berenice
“Yes," I said, "for the love of God!”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Cask of Amontillado
“Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”
Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.”
Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven and Other Poems


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