Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Robyn Davidson.

Robyn Davidson Robyn Davidson > Quotes


Robyn Davidson quotes (showing 1-30 of 50)

“It seems to me that the good lord in his infinate wisdom gave us three things to make life bearable- hope, jokes, and dogs. But the greatest of these was dogs.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“The two important things that I did learn were that you are as powerful and strong as you allow yourself to be, and that the most difficult part of any endeavour is taking the first step, making the first decision.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks
“And there are new kinds of nomads, not people who are at home everywhere, but who are at home nowhere. I was one of them ”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“Real travel would be to see the world, for even an instant, with another's eyes”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“I experienced that sinking feeling you get when you know you have conned yourself into doing something difficult and there's no going back.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“To be free is to learn, to test yourself constantly, to gamble. It is not safe. I had learnt to use my fears as stepping stones rather than stumbling blocks, and”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks
“There are some moments in life that are like pivots around which your existence turns—small intuitive flashes, when you know you have done something correct for a change, when you think you are on the right track. I watched a pale dawn streak the cliffs with Day-glo and realized this was one of them. It was a moment of pure, uncomplicated confidence—and lasted about ten seconds.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“I liked myself this way, it was such a relief to be free of disguises an prettiness and attractiveness. Above all that horrible, false, debilitating attractiveness that women hide behind. I puled my hat down over my ears so that they stuck out beneath it. 'I must remember this whn I get back. I must not fall into that trap again.' I must let people see me as I am. Like this? Yes, why not like this. But then I realized hat the rules pertaining to one set of circumstances do not necessarily pertain to another. Back there, this would just be another disguise. Back there, there was no nakedness, no one could afford it. Everyone had their social personae well fortified...”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“It’s important that we leave each other and the comfort of it, and circle away, even though it’s hard sometimes, so that we can come back and swap information about what we’ve learnt even if what we do changes us and”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“As I look back on the trip now, as I try to sort out fact from fiction, try to remember how I felt at that particular time, or during that particular incident, try to relive those memories that have been buried so deep, and distorted so ruthlessly, there is one clear fact that emerges from the quagmire. The trip was easy. It was no more dangerous than crossing the street, or driving to the beach, or eating peanuts. The two important things that I did learn were that you are as powerful and strong as you allow yourself to be, and that the most difficult part of any endeavor is taking the first step, making the first decision. And I knew even then that I would forget them time and time again and would have to go back and repeat those words that had become meaningless and try to remember. I knew even then that, instead of remembering the truth of it, I would lapse into a useless nostalgia. Camel trips, as I suspected all a long, and as I was about to have confirmed, do not begin or end, they merely change form.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“...desert time refused to structure itself. It preferred instead to flow in curlicues, vortices and tunnels,...”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“... I had to learn how to be cheerful in the face of adversity”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“So I had made a decision which carried with it things that I could not articulate at the time. I had made the choice instinctively, and only later had given it meaning. The trip had never been billed in my mind as an adventure in the sense of something to be proved. And it struck me then that the most difficult things has been the decision to act, the rest had been merely tenacity -- and the fears were paper tigers. One really could do anything one had decided to do whether it were changing a job, moving to a new place, divorcing a husband or whatever,m one really cold act to change and control one's life;and the procedure, the process, was its own reward.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“When I die, this is the only gold that will go with me. What does one take after death? Just one's good deeds and the love of others.”
Robyn Davidson
“To be free one needs constant and unrelenting vigilance over one's weaknesses. A vigilance which requires a moral energy most of us are incapable of manufacturing. We relax back into the moulds of habit. They are secure, they bind us and keep us contained at the expense of freedom. To break the moulds, to be heedless of the seductions of security is an impossible struggle, but one of the few that count. To be free is to learn, to test yourself constantly, to gamble.”
Robyn Davidson
“Why did people circle one another, consumed with either fear or envy, when all the they were fearing or envying was illusion? Why did they build psychological fortresses and barriers around themselves that would take a Ph.D. in safe-cracking to get through, which even they could not penetrate from the inside? And once again I compared European society with Aboriginal. The one so archetypally paranoid, grasping, destructive, the other so sane. I didn't want ever to leave this desert. I knew that I would forget.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“Camel trips, as I suspected all along, and as I was about to have confirmed, do not being or end: they mere change form.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
tags: life
“If I had any kind of creed in regard to living among strangers, it was this: once could criticize one's own place, indeed one had a duty to do so, but when crossing a cultural border one left behind judgements as to how life should be organized”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“... It is better to proceed with one's duty in the service of others than wallow in the pain attachments bring”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“And I recognized then the process by which I had always attempted difficult things. I had simply not allowed myself to think of the consequences, but had closed my eyes, jumped in, and before I knew where I was, it was impossible to renege. I was basically a dreadful coward, I knew that about myself. The only way I could overcome this was to trick myself with that other self, who lived in dream and fantasy and who was annoyingly lackadaisical and unpractical. All passion, no sense, no order, no instinct for self-preservation. That’s what I had done, and now that cowardly self had discovered an unburnt bridge by which to return to the past. As Renata Adler writes in Speedboat: I think when you are truly stuck, when you have stood still in the same spot for too long, you throw a grenade in exactly the spot you were standing in, and jump, and pray. It is the momentum of last resort.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“And here I was at the end of my trip, with everything just as fuzzy and unreal as the beginning. It was easier for me to see myself in Rick's lens, riding down to the beach in that cliched sunset, just as it was easier for me to stand with my friends and wave goodbye to the loopy woman with the camels, the itching smell of the dust around us, and in our eyes the feat that we had left so much unsaid. There was an unpronounceable joy and an aching sadness to it. It had all happened too suddenly. I didn't believe this was the end at all. There must be some mistake. Someone had just robbed me of a couple of month in there somewhere. There was not so much an anticlimactic quality about the arrival at the ocean, as the overwhelming feeling that I had somehow misplaced the penultimate scene.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
“I could not get used to the idea of ther being classes of people inherently inferior to oneself, to whom one could be as odiously condescendign or downright brutal as one likes, yet with whom one lived as intimately as family.”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“FOR THE NEXT TWO DAYS Eddie and I walked together, we played charades trying to communicate and fell into fits of hysteria at each other’s antics. We stalked rabbits and missed, picked bush foods and generally had a good time. He was sheer pleasure to be with, exuding all those qualities typical of old Aboriginal people — strength, warmth, self-possession, wit, and a kind of rootedness, a substantiality that immediately commanded respect.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“I had been sick of carrying around the self-indulgent negativity which was so much the malaise of my generation, my sex and my class.”
Robyn Davidson
“When God made the firs Raika, that man turned to God and said, "You're something else. You've given me two eyes, two ears, two feet, two hands but only one stomach. It isn't fair. Why did you do it?" God laughed at him and answered, "You foolish Raika, don't you realize how much trouble you're going to have filling one?”
Robyn Davidson, Desert Places
“I had rediscovered people in my past and come to terms with my feelings towards them. I had learnt what love was. That love wanted the best possible for those you cared for even if that excluded yourself. That before, I had wanted to possess people without loving them, and now I could love them and wish them the best without needing them.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“Capacity for survival may be the ability to be changed by environment.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“Because if you are fragmented and uncertain it is terrifying to find the boundaries of yourself melt. Survival in a desert, then, requires that you lose this fragmentation, and fast. It is not a mystical experience, or rather, it is dangerous to attach these sorts of words to it.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“The discomfort I felt under that moral pressure has stayed with me all my life and made me eternally wary of the blindness of ideological certainty.”
Robyn Davidson, Tracks: One Woman's Solo Trek Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback
“If I do depart this world out here, let it be known that I went out grinning will you, and loving it. LOVING IT.
Steve, are you listening ? I FEEL GREAT. Life’s so joyous, so sad, so ephemeral, so crazy, so meaningless, so goddamn funny. This is paradise, and I wish I could give you some.”
Robyn Davidson

« previous 1

All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback Tracks
6,464 ratings
Open Preview
Desert Places Desert Places
215 ratings
Open Preview
From Alice to Ocean: Alone Across the Outback From Alice to Ocean
111 ratings
Inside Tracks: Alone Across the Outback Inside Tracks
48 ratings