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Edmund Wilson quotes (showing 1-19 of 19)

“No two persons ever read the same book.”
Edmund Wilson
“I find more and more that I am a man of the 1920s. I still expect something exciting. Drinks, animated conversation, gaiety: the uninhibited exchange of ideas.”
Edmund Wilson
“No hay dos personas que lean el mismo libro.”
Edmund Wilson
“There is nothing more demoralizing than a small but adequate income.”
Edmund Wilson
“Marxism is the opium of the intellectuals”
Edmund Wilson
“The cruelest thing that has happened to Lincoln since being shot by Booth was to have fallen into the hands of Carl Sandburg.”
Edmund Wilson
“I have learned to read the papers calmly and not to hate the fools I read about.”
Edmund Wilson
“She was one of those women whose features are not perfect and who in their moments of dimness may not seem even pretty, but who, excited by the blood or the spirit, become almost supernaturally beautiful.”
Edmund Wilson
“It is a proof of the divergence of the tendencies of the socialist and the bourgeois pictures of history—and from now on there will be two distinct historical cultures running side by side without ever really fusing—that people who have been brought up on the conventional version of history and know all about the Robespierrist Terror during the Great French Revolution, should find it an unfamiliar fact that the Terror of the government of Thiers executed, imprisoned or exiled more people—the number has been estimated at a hundred thousand—in that one week of the suppression of the [Paris] Commune [of 1871] than the revolutionary Terror of Robespierre had done in three years.”
Edmund Wilson
“...an acquaintance with the great works of art and thought is the only real insurance against the barbarism of the time.”
Edmund Wilson
“While the romantic individualist deludes himself with unrealizable fantasies, in the attempt to evade bourgeois society, and only succeeds in destroying himself, he lets humanity fall a victim to the industrial-commercial processes, which, unimpeded by his dreaming, go on with their deadly work.”
Edmund Wilson
“No two persons ever read the same book”
Edmund Wilson
“The experience of mankind on the earth is always changing as man develops and has to deal with new combinations of elements; and the writer who is to be anything more than an echo of his predecessors must always find expression for something which has never yet been expressed, must master a new set of phenomena. . . . With each such victory of the human intellect, whether in history, in philosophy or in poetry, we experience a deep satisfaction: we have been cured of some ache of disorder, relieved of some oppressive burden of uncomprehended events.”
Edmund Wilson
“He believes, but he does not believe: the impossibility of believing is the impossibility which he accepts most reluctantly, but still it is there with the other impossibilities of this world which is too full of weeping for a child to understand.”
Edmund Wilson, Axel's Castle: A Study of the Imaginative Literature of 1870-1930
“In his novels from beginning to end, Dickens is making the same point always: that to the English governing classes the people they govern are not real.”
Edmund Wilson
“Dan, who was writing a book on the radical activity of the twenties and thirties, took the occasion of our trip to ask me about them. The whole thing seems to me so stale that I can't imagine anybody's now wanting to write about it, but we ran over the personalities and I told him a lot of stories. It seemed to me like that grisly museum of the early 1900's that I had had him visit at Niagara Falls: old stuffed two-headed calves, motheaten panthers attacking a stag, dried-up corpses from Indian graves, big bags made of rubber tires in which people had tried to shoot the falls--and around it all-powerful industrial life that no show of resistance could stop, which had ruined the landscape of the river and was crowding out everything else. ”
Edmund Wilson, Upstate: Records and Recollections of Northern New York
“If I could only keep up my spirit- if I could only play the game according to the sportsman's code which Rita had been trying to teach me so gravely and so sweetly- if I could only, I told myself, do that, then in the long run, all might be right between us- because I had not nagged her or wearied her, because I had proved myself her peer, as prompt to offer all for love and as brave to bear its passing. If I could only remember that the days were not bricks to be laid row on row, to be built into a solid house, where one might dwell in safety and peace, but only food for the fires of the heart, the fires which keep the poet alive as the citizen never lives, but which burn all the roofs of security!”
Edmund Wilson, I Thought of Daisy
“No two persons ever read the same book.

-Edmund Wilson”
Edmund Wilson
“No two person, ever read the same book.”
Edmund Wilson


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Axel's Castle: A Study of the Imaginative Literature of 1870-1930 Axel's Castle
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Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War Patriotic Gore
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