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Stephanie Pearl-McPhee quotes (showing 1-30 of 53)

“...the number one reason knitters knit is because they are so smart that they need knitting to make boring things interesting. Knitters are so compellingly clever that they simply can't tolerate boredom. It takes more to engage and entertain this kind of human, and they need an outlet or they get into trouble.

"...knitters just can't watch TV without doing something else. Knitters just can't wait in line, knitters just can't sit waiting at the doctor's office. Knitters need knitting to add a layer of interest in other, less constructive ways.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
“100 years ago, buying something you could make was considered wasteful; now making something you could buy is considered wasteful. I am not convinced this is a step in the right direction.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, All Wound Up: The Yarn Harlot Writes for a Spin
“ I will continue to freak out my children by knitting in public. It's good for them.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“ It is a peculiarity of knitters that they chronically underestimate the amount of time it takes to knit something. Birthday on Saturday? No problem. Socks are small. Never mind that the average sock knit out of sock-weight yarn contains about 17,000 stitches. Never mind that you need two of them. (That's 34,000 stitches, for anybody keeping track.)
Socks are only physically small. By stitch count, they are immense.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“SABLE- A common knitting acronym that stands for Stash Acquisition Beyond Life Expectancy.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“Sometimes, people come up to me when I am knitting and they say things like, "Oh, I wish I could knit, but I'm just not the kind of person who can sit and waste time like that." How can knitting be wasting time? First, I never just knit; I knit and think, knit and listen, knit and watch. Second, you aren't wasting time if you get a useful or beautiful object at the end of it.

I will remember that not everyone understands. I will resist the urge to ask others what they do when they watch TV.
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
Advice for New Knitters

When choosing a pattern, look for ones that have words such as "simple", "basic", and "easy". If you see the words "intriguing", "challenging", or "intricate", look elsewhere.

If you happen across a pattern that says "heirloom", slowly put down the pattern and back away.

"Heirloom" is knitting code for "This pattern is so difficult that you would consider death a relief".
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“There is practically no activity that cannot be enhanced or replaced by knitting, if you really want to get obsessive about it.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“The best reason for a knitter to marry is that you can't teach the cat to be impressed when you finish a lace scarf.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“In the nineteeth century, knitting was prescribed to women as a cure for nervousness and hysteria. Many new knitters find this sort of hard to believe because, until you get good at it, knitting seems to cause those ailments.

The twitch above my right eye will disappear with knitting practice.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“I will always buy extra yarn. I will not try to tempt fate.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“I recognize that knitting can improve my mood in trying circumstances”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“Despite what we knitters know to be true, the non-knitting world somehow persists in thinking that a "knitter" looks a certain way. Most likely, this picture is one of an elderly woman, grandmotherly and polite, sitting in her rocking chair surrounded by homemade cookies and accompanied by a certain number of cats.

In reality, a knitter today is just as likely to be young, hip, male, and sitting at a "Stitch and Bitch" in a local bar. Several of today's best knitting designers are men, and a knitter is as likely to have body piercings as homemade cookies.

Despite our diversity, the tendency to be accompanied by a cat is an oddity among knitters that cannot be explained.
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“As long as there has been knitting there have been battles about it. There are self-declared "yarn snobs," who frown on using anything but natural fibers; "gauge snobs", who wouldn't be caught dead with chunky yarn; and "experience snobs", who claim you can't declare yourself a real knitter until you abandon novelty yarns. The truth is that the knitting world is a tiny metaphor for the real world. It takes all kinds.

I will not allow myself to feel bad if someone disapproves of my knitting. I will also resist the urge to stuff his mailbox full of chunky acrylic fun fur at 3:00 am.
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“I am a person who works well under pressure. In fact, I work so well under pressure that at times, I will procrastinate in order to create this pressure.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
“When confronted with a birthday in a week I will remember that a book can be a really good present, too.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“I will not let the non-knitters of the world decide how normal I am.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
“Some knitters say that they buy yarn with no project in mind and wait patiently for the yarn to "speak" to them. This reminds me of Michelangelo, who believed that every block of stone he carved had the statue waiting inside and that all he did was reveal it. I think I've had yarn speak to me during the knitting process, and I've definitely spoken to it. Perhaps I'm doing it wrong, or maybe my yarn and I aren't on such good terms, but it really seems to me that all I say is "please" and all it ever says is "no".”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“it is pure potential. Every ball or skein of yarn holds something inside it, and the great mystery of what that might be can be almost spiritual”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, Knitting Rules!: The Yarn Harlot Unravels the Mysteries of Swatching, Stashing, Ribbing & Rolling to Free Your Inner Knitter
“I make a habit of setting aside some time each evening to take out my knitting and work quietly on it, happily relaxing. I believe that it prepares me for sleep and washes away the cares of my day.

I will consider that intarsia, or Fair Isle with three or more colors in a row, prepares nobody for sleep and cursing loudly while flinging knitting around the living room is about as far away from soothing as you can get.
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“Many years ago, when I used to smoke, my lighter was often easier to find than my scissors. If I couldn't find the scissors, or was feeling too lazy to get up, I used the lighter to burn the yarn in one place to break it. Other than the smell, this worked fairly well. Later, when I found my scissors, I would cut off the little charred bits.

One day, I was knitting a cotton facecloth and needed to cut the end. I flicked my lighter, expecting to singe the one spot, thus breaking the yarn.

I will remember that cotton is highly flammable, and that the knitting Fates punish laziness. I will also remember that a flaming facecloth can be extinguished with a cup of coffee...in a pinch.
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“I will resist the urge to underestimate the complexity of knitting.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“Achieving the state of SABLE is not, as many people who live with these knitters believe, a reason to stop buying yarn, but for the knitter it is an indication to write a will, bequeathing the stash to an appropriate heir.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“It is important for knitters to know two things about frogging: that cats are capable of this knitting action, and even seem to enjoy it and seek opportunities to do it; and that foul language is a normal, healthy accompaniment to frogging, whether it is you or the cat that accomplished the task.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“A half finished shawl left on the coffee table isn't a mess; it's an object of art.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
“You don't knit because you are patient. You are patient because you knit.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, Things I Learned From Knitting
“Dear designer of questionable intent,

Please send me a photo of yourself. Please be wearing the knitted pants that you designed. It's not that I don't believe that there is anyone out there thing enough to wear horizontally stripped trousers knit from chunky wool, it's just that I would like to know whether you are deliberately cruel or whether you are the one woman these would look really great on.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much
“It's only knitting and it's one of the few times in your life when there are no bad consequences to a mistake.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, Knitting Rules!: The Yarn Harlot Unravels the Mysteries of Swatching, Stashing, Ribbing & Rolling to Free Your Inner Knitter
Five things I'd rather do than swatch for my new project

1. Get a spinal tap.

2. Scrub the bathtub after all three of my daughters have come home from "Sandbox day" at the park.

3. Babysit two-year-old triplets while simultaneously diffusing a bomb.

4. Bathe a cat.

5. KNIT MY NEW PROJECT.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, Things I Learned From Knitting
Knitting is still trying to teach me

That no matter how well you knit, looking at your work too closely isn't helpful. It's like kissing with your eyes open: nobody looks good that close up.”
Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, Things I Learned From Knitting

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