Sakyong Mipham Sakyong Mipham > Quotes


Sakyong Mipham quotes (showing 1-29 of 29)

“ Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We're left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don't we think about training our minds?”
Sakyong Mipham
“Like gravity, karma is so basic we often don't even notice it.”
Sakyong Mipham
“True happiness is always available to us, but first we have to create the environment for it to flourish.”
Sakyong Mipham, Turning the Mind Into an Ally
“One of my favorite Tibetan sayings is “Even if you’re going to die tomorrow, you can learn something tonight.”
Sakyong Mipham, Turning the Mind Into an Ally
“Once I was running and there was someone on the treadmill next to me who stopped running to answer a question I asked and flew of the back of the treadmill. Being fully engaged has many benefits.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“If we do not push ourselves enough, we do not grow, but if we push ourselves too much, we regress. What is enough will change, depending on where we are and what we are doing. In that sense, the present moment is always some kind of beginning.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The body benefits from movement, and the mind benefits from stillness.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“What is really happening in meditation is that we are developing the ability to think when we want to, and to not think when we don’t want to.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“There is a direct correlation between physical exertion and mental relief.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“When stress is the basic state of mind, even good things stress us out. We have to learn to let go.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Running and meditation are very personal activities. Therefore they are lonely. This loneliness is one of their best qualities because it strengthens our incentive to motivate ourselves.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The point of handling our motivation is not necessarily to channel it into a drive to be successful; that would be ambition. Rather, the point is to”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The wise are balanced, and the foolish are extreme.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Then we wonder, “Why is nothing turning out the way I want?” Tiger mind creates a little gap in which we can look at our choices. We could get mad or not get mad. We could manipulate or not manipulate. We could become desirous and fixate. We could get jealous or not. It’s up to us. Wisdom and compassion begin with cultivating discernment—not just reacting to what happens.”
Sakyong Mipham, Ruling Your World: Ancient Strategies For Modern Life
“In the beginning of running and of meditation, one of the biggest obstacles is laziness. One kind of laziness is basic slothfulness, in which we are unable to extract ourselves from the television or couch. In this case, just a little bit of exercise can send a message to the body that it is time to move forward. Even putting on workout clothes and beginning to stretch helps bring us out of our sloth. By the same token, sitting down to follow the breath for even five minutes has the power to move us out of laziness. Another form of laziness is that we don’t make time in our busy, speedy life to go for a run or to sit down and practice.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The practice of overcoming hope is recognizing our positive qualities. With excessive hope, we begin to belittle what we have achieved. We might then feel inadequate and have fear of not achieving more.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“I have always found a natural relationship between running and meditation. Running can be a support for meditation, and meditation can be a support for running. Running is a natural form of exercise, for it is simply an extension of walking. When we run, we strengthen our heart, remove stagnant air, revitalize our nervous system, and increase our aerobic capacity. It helps us develop a positive attitude. It creates exertion and stamina and gives us a way to deal with pain. It helps us relax. For many of us, it offers a feeling of freedom. Likewise, meditation is a natural exercise of the mind—an opportunity to strengthen, reinvigorate, and cleanse. Through meditation we can connect with that long-forgotten goodness we all have. It is very powerful to feel that sense of goodness: having confidence and bravery in our innermost being.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Gentleness can be developed with simple thoughts. First, appreciate who you are and make friends with yourself. Look at what you can do, and don’t allow what you cannot do to oppress you. Rather, regard it as a future adventure. The practice of meditation allows for this development to take place.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Remember why you are meditating: to balance the activity of your life by working with your mind.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Articulating and expanding your motivation when you wake up in the morning has the power to change your whole day.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Thus the mind is more present and at peace. So the clarity and peace of mind we feel after running is mostly because the wild horse is tired, not necessarily because it has been tamed.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The bones and tendons of the mind are mindfulness and awareness. Mindfulness is the mind’s strength, and awareness is its flexibility.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“The difference between the mind and the body is that no one is surprised to get winded while running to catch the bus. Nobody gets mad at themselves, saying, “I can’t believe I can’t run 26.2 miles!” However, when we become overwhelmed by longer hours at work, more e-mails, or more parenting duties, we become irritable, moody, and unhappy. It doesn’t occur to us that our mind is out of shape. We put more stress on ourselves because we assume we should just be able to handle it all.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“Past events are already gone, and the future is yet to happen. It is only in the present that we can be in our life. The present is the joystick, controlling the moment, and thus the direction our life takes. Being with the breath is the most effective way of being in the present. It completely connects us with reality.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“In meditation, placing our attention on the breathing takes the mind from daydreaming, worrying, thinking, and fantasizing. It gives our mind something healthy to do.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“when we are brave enough to be in the present, we have the power to transform the world.”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
“In the modern culture of speed, we seem to not do anything fully. We are half watching television and half using the computer; we are driving while talking on the phone; we have a hard time having even one conversation; when we sit down to eat, we are reading a newspaper and watching television, and even when we watch television, we are flipping through channels. This quality of speed gives life a superficial feeling: we never experience anything fully. We engage ourselves in these activities in order to live a full life, but being speedy”
Sakyong Mipham, Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind


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