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Robert Browning quotes (showing 1-30 of 89)

“Who hears music, feels his solitude
Peopled at once.”
Robert Browning, The complete poetical works of Browning
“Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp,
Or what's a heaven for?”
Robert Browning, Men and Women and Other Poems
“how sad and bad and mad it was - but then, how it was sweet”
Robert Browning
“Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be, the last of life, for which the first was made. Our times are in his hand who saith, 'A whole I planned, youth shows but half; Trust God: See all, nor be afraid!”
Robert Browning
“Love is the energy of life.”
Robert Browning
“My sun sets to rise again.”
Robert Browning
“Best be yourself, imperial, plain, and true.”
Robert Browning
“I show you doubt, to prove that faith exists.”
Robert Browning
“There is an inmost center in us all, where truth abides in fullness;....and, to know, rather consists in opening out a way where the imprisoned splendor may escape, then in effecting entry for a light supposed to be without.”
Robert Browning
“Take away love and our earth is a tomb.”
Robert Browning
“I was made and meant to look for you and wait for you and become yours forever.”
Robert Browning
“Days decrease, / And autumn grows, autumn in everything.”
Robert Browning
“Grow old with me! The best is yet to be.”
Robert Browning
“Ignorance is not innocence but sin.”
Robert Browning
“Paracelsus

At times I almost dream
I too have spent a life the sages’ way,
And tread once more familiar paths. Perchance
I perished in an arrogant self-reliance
Ages ago; and in that act a prayer
For one more chance went up so earnest, so
Instinct with better light let in by death,
That life was blotted out — not so completely
But scattered wrecks enough of it remain,
Dim memories, as now, when once more seems
The goal in sight again.”
Robert Browning
“Love, hope, fear, faith - these make humanity; These are its sign and note and character”
Robert Browning, Browning's Paracelsus: Being the Text of Browning's Poem
“When the fight begins within himself, a man's worth something.”
Robert Browning
“The rain set early in tonight,
The sullen wind was soon awake,
It tore the elm-tops down for spite,
And did its best to vex the lake:
I listened with heart fit to break.
When glided in Porphyria; straight
She shut the cold out and the storm,
And kneeled and made the cheerless grate
Blaze up and all the cottage warm;”
Robert Browning
“God is the perfect poet.”
Robert Browning
“What's the earth
With all its art, verse, music, worth —
Compared with love, found, gained, and kept?”
Robert Browning
“In this world, who can do a thing, will not;
And who would do it, cannot, I perceive:
Yet the will's somewhat — somewhat, too, the power —
And thus we half-men struggle.”
Robert Browning, Robert Browning's Poetry
“Without love, our earth is a tomb”
Robert Browning
“On a day like today I am stung by the splendor of a sudden thought.”
Robert Browning, Dramatic Lyrics
“A lion may die of an ass's kick.”
Robert Browning, Robert Browning's Poetry
“If you get simple beauty and naught else, you get about the best thing god invents”
Robert Browning, The Poems of Robert Browning
“Heart, fear nothing, for, heart, thou shalt find her- Next time, herself!-not the trouble behind her ”
Robert Browning
“ Life In Love

Escape me?
Never---
Beloved!
While I am I, and you are you,
So long as the world contains us both,
Me the loving and you the loth
While the one eludes, must the other pursue.
My life is a fault at last, I fear:
It seems too much like a fate, indeed!
Though I do my best I shall scarce succeed.
But what if I fail of my purpose here?
It is but to keep the nerves at strain,
To dry one's eyes and laugh at a fall,
And, baffled, get up and begin again,---
So the chace takes up one's life ' that's all.
While, look but once from your farthest bound
At me so deep in the dust and dark,
No sooner the old hope goes to ground
Than a new one, straight to the self-same mark,
I shape me---
Ever
Removed!”
Robert Browning
“I.
My first thought was, he lied in every word,
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the workings of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee, that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby.

II.
What else should he be set for, with his staff?
What, save to waylay with his lies, ensnare
All travellers who might find him posted there,
And ask the road? I guessed what skull-like laugh
Would break, what crutch 'gin write my epitaph
For pastime in the dusty thoroughfare.

III.
If at his counsel I should turn aside
Into that ominous tract which, all agree,
Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly
I did turn as he pointed, neither pride
Now hope rekindling at the end descried,
So much as gladness that some end might be.

IV.
For, what with my whole world-wide wandering,
What with my search drawn out through years, my hope
Dwindled into a ghost not fit to cope
With that obstreperous joy success would bring,
I hardly tried now to rebuke the spring
My heart made, finding failure in its scope.

V.
As when a sick man very near to death
Seems dead indeed, and feels begin and end
The tears and takes the farewell of each friend,
And hears one bit the other go, draw breath
Freelier outside, ('since all is o'er,' he saith
And the blow fallen no grieving can amend;')

VI.
When some discuss if near the other graves
be room enough for this, and when a day
Suits best for carrying the corpse away,
With care about the banners, scarves and staves
And still the man hears all, and only craves
He may not shame such tender love and stay.

VII.
Thus, I had so long suffered in this quest,
Heard failure prophesied so oft, been writ
So many times among 'The Band' to wit,
The knights who to the Dark Tower's search addressed
Their steps - that just to fail as they, seemed best,
And all the doubt was now - should I be fit?

VIII.
So, quiet as despair I turned from him,
That hateful cripple, out of his highway
Into the path he pointed. All the day
Had been a dreary one at best, and dim
Was settling to its close, yet shot one grim
Red leer to see the plain catch its estray.

IX.
For mark! No sooner was I fairly found
Pledged to the plain, after a pace or two,
Than, pausing to throw backwards a last view
O'er the safe road, 'twas gone; grey plain all round;
Nothing but plain to the horizon's bound.
I might go on, naught else remained to do.

X.
So on I went. I think I never saw
Such starved ignoble nature; nothing throve:
For flowers - as well expect a cedar grove!
But cockle, spurge, according to their law
Might propagate their kind with none to awe,
You'd think; a burr had been a treasure trove.

XI.
No! penury, inertness and grimace,
In some strange sort, were the land's portion. 'See
Or shut your eyes,' said Nature peevishly,
It nothing skills: I cannot help my case:
Tis the Last Judgement's fire must cure this place
Calcine its clods and set my prisoners free.”
Robert Browning
“Out of your whole life give but a moment!
All of your life that has gone before,
All to come after it, -so you ignore,
So you make perfect the present, condense,
In a rapture of rage, for perfection's endowment,
Thought and feeling and soul and sense. ”
Robert Browning
“A man's reach must exceed his grasp;
Or what's a Heaven for?”
Robert Browning, Robert Browning's Poetry

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