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Edmund Spenser quotes (showing 1-30 of 30)

“For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“For whatsoever from one place doth fall,
Is with the tide unto an other brought:
For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“So furiously each other did assayle,
As if their soules they would attonce haue rent
Out of their brests, that streames of bloud did rayle
Adowne, as if their springes of life were spent;
That all the ground with purple bloud was sprent,
And all their armours staynd with bloudie gore,
Yet scarcely once to breath would they relent,
So mortall was their malice and so sore,
Become of fayned friendship which they vow'd afore.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four
“There is nothing lost, but may be found, if sought.

(No hay nada perdido, que no pueda encontrarse, si se lo busca)”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book Five
“For whatsoever from one place doth fall,
Is with a tide unto another brought:
For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“What though the sea with waves continuall
Doe eate the earth, it is no more at all ;
Ne is the earth the lesse, or loseth ought :
For whatsoever from one place doth fall
Is with the tyde unto another brought :
For there is nothing lost, that may be found if sought.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Ah! when will this long weary day have end,
And lende me leave to come unto my love?

- Epithalamion”
Edmund Spenser, Amoretti and Epithalamion
My Love Is Like To Ice, And I To Fire

My love is like to ice, and I to fire;
How comes it then that this her cold so great
Is not dissolv'd through my so hot desire,
But harder grows the more I her entreat?
Or how comes it that my exceeding heat
Is not delay’d by her heart-frozen cold;
But that I burn much more in boiling sweat,
And feel my flames augmented manifold!
What more miraculous thing may be told,
That fire, which all things melts, should harden ice;
And ice, which is congeal’d with senseless cold,
Should kindle fire by wonderful device!
Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
That it can alter all the course of kind.”
Edmund Spenser, Amoretti and Epithalamion
“For love is a celestial harmony
Of likely hearts compos'd of stars' concent,
Which join together in sweet sympathy,
To work each other's joy and true content,
Which they have harbour'd since their first descent
Out of their heavenly bowers, where they did see
And know each other here belov'd to be.”
Edmund Spenser, Fowre Hymnes
“One day I wrote her name upon the strand,
But came the waves and washèd it away:
Again I wrote it with a second hand,
But came the tide, and made my pains his prey.”
Edmund Spenser, Amoretti and Epithalamion
One Day I Wrote Her Name Upon the Strand

One day I wrote her name upon the strand,
But came the waves and washèd it away:
Again I wrote it with a second hand,
But came the tide and made my pains his prey.
Vain man (said she) that dost in vain assay
A mortal thing so to immortalise;
For I myself shall like to this decay,
And eke my name be wipèd out likewise.
Not so (quod I); let baser things devise
To die in dust, but you shall live by fame;
My verse your virtues rare shall eternise,
And in the heavens write your glorious name:
Where, when as Death shall all the world subdue,
Our love shall live, and later life renew.”
Edmund Spenser, Amoretti and Epithalamion
“And he that strives to touch the stars
Oft stumbles at a straw.”
Edmund Spenser, The Shepherd's Calendar: Twelve Aeglogues Proportionable to the Twelve Months
“But O the exceeding grace
Of highest God, that loves his creatures so,
And all his works with mercy doth embrace,
That blessed angels, he sends to and fro,
To serve to wicked man, to serve his wicked foe.”
Edmund Spenser, Faerie Queen Book 1 Ed Bayley
“Aye me, how many perils do enfold
The righteous man, to make him daily fall?
Were not, that heavenly grace doth him uphold,
And steadfast truth acquite him out of all.”
Edmund Spenser, Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves
“Yet gold all is not, that doth gold seem,
Nor all good knights, that shake well spear and shield:
The worth of all men by their end esteem,
And then praise, or due reproach them yield.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book Two
“O but," quoth she, "great griefe will not be tould,
And can more easily be thought, then said."
"Right so"; quoth he, "but he, that never would,
Could never: will to might gives greatest aid."
"But grief," quoth she, "does great grow displaid,
If then it find not helpe, and breedes despaire."
"Despaire breedes not," quoth he, "where faith is staid."
"No faith so fast," quoth she, "but flesh does paire."
"Flesh may empaire," quoth he, "but reason can repaire.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“He oft finds med'cine, who his griefe imparts;
But double griefs afflict concealing harts,
As raging flames who striveth to supresse.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Men call you fayre, and you doe credit it,
For that your self ye daily such doe see:
But the trew fayre, that is the gentle wit,
And vertuous mind, is much more praysd of me.
For all the rest, how ever fayre it be,
Shall turne to nought and loose that glorious hew:
But onely that is permanent and free
From frayle corruption, that doth flesh ensew.
That is true beautie: that doth argue you
To be divine and borne of heavenly seed:
Deriv'd from that fayre Spirit, from whom al true
And perfect beauty did at first proceed.
He onely fayre, and what he fayre hath made,
All other fayre lyke flowres untymely fade.”
Edmund Spenser, Amoretti and Epithalamion
“His Lady sad to see his sore constraint,
Cried out, "Now now Sir knight, shew what ye bee,
Add faith unto your force, and be not faint:
Strangle her, else she sure will strangle thee."
That when he heard, in great perplexitie,
His gall did grate for griefe and high distaine,
And knitting all his force got one hand free,
Wherewith he grypt her gorge with so great paine,
That soone to loose her wicked bands did her constraine.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Why then should witless man so much misweene
That nothing is but that which he hath seene?”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“For trumpets sterne to chaunge mine Oaten reeds,
And sing of Knights and Ladies gentle deeds;”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Woe never wants, where every cause is caught, and rash Occasion makes unquiet life.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book Two
“Yet nothing did he dread, but euer was ydrad.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Vntroubled night they say giues counsell best.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“Here haue I cause, in men iust blame to find,
That in their proper prayse too partiall bee,
And not indifferent to woman kind,
To whom no share in armes and cheualrie
They do impart, ne maken memorie
Of their brave gestes and prowess martiall;
Scarse do they spare to one or two or three,
Rowme in their writs; yet the same writing small
Does all their deeds deface, and dims their glories all,

But by record of antique times I find,
That women wont in warres to beare most sway,
And to all great exploits them selues inclind:
Of which they still the girlond bore away,
Till enuious Men fearing their rules decay,
Gan coyne straight laws to curb their liberty;
Yet sith they warlike armes haue layd away:
They haue exceld in artes and policy,
That now we foolish men that prayse gin eke t'enuy.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four
“Thrice happy she that is so well assured Unto herself and settled so in heart That neither will for better be allured Ne fears to worse with any chance to start, But like a steddy ship doth strongly part The raging waves and keeps her course aright; Ne aught for tempest doth from it depart, Ne aught for fairer weather's false delight. Such self-assurance need not fear the spight Of grudging foes; ne favour seek of friends; But in the stay of her own stedfast might Neither to one herself nor other bends. Most happy she that most assured doth rest, But he most happy who such one loves best.”
Edmund Spenser
“Ah for pittie, wil ranke Winters rage,
These bitter blasts neuer ginne tasswage?
The keene cold blowes throug my beaten hyde,
All as I were through the body gryde.
My ragged rontes all shiver and shake,
As doen high Towers in an earthquake:
They wont in the wind wagge their wrigle tailes,
Perke as Peacock: but nowe it auales.”
Edmund Spenser, The Shepherd's Calendar and Other Poems
tags: winter
“Vaine is the vaunt, and victory unjust, that more to mighty hands, then rightfull cause doth trust.”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“The youthfull knight could not for ought be staide,
But forth vnto the darksome hole he went,
And looked in:his glistring armor made
A litle glooming light, much like a shade,”
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
“After long stormes and tempests sad assay,    Which hardly I endured heretofore:    in dread of death and daungerous dismay,    with which my silly barke was tossed sore: I doe at length descry the happy shore,    in which I hope ere long for to arryue:    fayre soyle it seemes from far and fraught with store    of all that deare and daynty is alyue. Most happy he that can at last atchyue    the ioyous safety of so sweet a rest:    whose least delight sufficeth to depriue    remembrance of all paines which him opprest. All paines are nothing in respect of this,    all sorrowes short that gaine eternall blisse.”
Edmund Spenser, Edmund Spenser: The Complete Poetical Works


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