Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following Tara Brach.

Tara Brach Tara Brach > Quotes


Tara Brach quotes (showing 1-30 of 55)

“Pain is not wrong. Reacting to pain as wrong initiates the trance of unworthiness. The moment we believe something is wrong, our world shrinks and we lose ourselves in the effort to combat the pain.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Perhaps the biggest tragedy of our lives is that freedom is possible, yet we can pass our years trapped in the same old patterns...We may want to love other people without holding back, to feel authentic, to breathe in the beauty around us, to dance and sing. Yet each day we listen to inner voices that keep our life small.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“We are uncomfortable because everything in our life keeps changing -- our inner moods, our bodies, our work, the people we love, the world we live in. We can't hold on to anything -- a beautiful sunset, a sweet taste, an intimate moment with a lover, our very existence as the body/mind we call self -- because all things come and go. Lacking any permanent satisfaction, we continuously need another injection of fuel, stimulation, reassurance from loved ones, medicine, exercise, and meditation. We are continually driven to become something more, to experience something else.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Imperfection is not our personal problem - it is a natural part of existing.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“When someone says to us, as Thich Nhat Hanh suggests, "Darling, I care about your suffering," a deep healing begins.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“The emotion of fear often works overtime. Even when there is no immediate threat, our body may remain tight and on guard, our mind narrowed to focus on what might go wrong. When this happens, fear is no longer functioning to secure our survival. We are caught in the trance of fear and our moment-to-moment experience becomes bound in reactivity. We spend our time and energy defending our life rather than living it fully.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“The intimacy that arises in listening and speaking truth is only possible if we can open to the vulnerability of our own hearts. Breathing in, contacting the life that is right here, is our first step. Once we have held ourselves with kindness, we can touch others in a vital and healing way.”
Tara Brach, True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart
“If we are taken over by craving, no matter who or what is before us, all we can see is how it might satisfy our needs. This kind of thirst contracts our body and mind into a profound trance. We move through the world with a kind of tunnel vision that prevents us from enjoying what is in front of us. The color of an autumn leaves or a passage of poetry merely amplifies the feeling that there is a gaping hole in our life. The smile of a child only reminds us that we are painfully childless. We turn away from simple pleasures because our craving compels us to seek more intense stimulation or numbing relief.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Clearly recognizing what is happening inside us, and regarding what we see with an open, kind and loving heart, is what I call Radical Acceptance. If we are holding back from any part of our experience, if our heart shuts out any part of who we are and what we feel, we are fueling the fears and feelings of separation that sustain the trance of unworthiness. Radical Acceptance directly dismantles the very foundations of this trance.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“But this revolutionary act of treating ourselves tenderly can begin to undo the aversive messages of a lifetime.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“The renowned seventh-century Zen master Seng-tsan taught that true freedom is being "without anxiety about imperfection.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“The boundary to what we can accept is the boundary to our freedom.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Feelings and stories of unworthiness and shame are perhaps the most binding element in the trance of fear. When we believe something is wrong with us, we are convinced we are in danger. Our shame fuels ongoing fear, and our fear fuels more shame. The very fact that we feel fear seems to prove that we are broken or incapable. When we are trapped in trance, being fearful and bad seem to define who we are. The anxiety in our body, the stories, the ways we make excuses, withdraw or lash out—these become to us the self that is most real.”
Tara Brach
“I recently read in the book My Stroke of Insight by brain scientist Jill Bolte Taylor that the natural life span of an emotion—the average time it takes for it to move through the nervous system and body—is only a minute and a half. After that we need thoughts to keep the emotion rolling. So if we wonder why we lock into painful emotional states like anxiety, depression, or rage, we need look no further than our own endless stream of inner dialogue.”
Tara Brach
“In bullfighting there is an interesting parallel to the pause as a place of refuge and renewal. It is believed that in the midst of a fight, a bull can find his own particular area of safety in the arena. There he can reclaim his strength and power. This place and inner state are called his querencia. As long as the bull remains enraged and reactive, the matador is in charge. Yet when he finds his querencia, he gathers his strength and loses his fear. From the matador's perspective, at this point the bull is truly dangerous, for he has tapped into his power.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Radical Acceptance is the willingness to experience ourselves and our lives as it is.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Each time you meet an old emotional pattern with presence, your awakening to truth can deepen. There’s less identification with the self in the story and more ability to rest in the awareness that is witnessing what’s happening. You become more able to abide in compassion, to remember and trust your true home. Rather than cycling repetitively through old conditioning, you are actually spiraling toward freedom.”
Tara Brach, True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart
“The great gift of a spiritual path is coming to trust that you can find a way to true refuge. You realize that you can start right where you are, in the midst of your life, and find peace in any circumstance. Even at those moments when the ground shakes terribly beneath you—when there’s a loss that will alter your life forever—you can still trust that you will find your way home. This is possible because you’ve touched the timeless love and awareness that are intrinsic to who you are.”
Tara Brach, True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart
“Learning to pause is the first step in the practice of Radical Acceptance. A pause is a suspension of activity, a time of temporary disengagement when we are no longer moving toward any goal. . . . The pause can occur in the midst of almost any activity and can last for an instant, for hours or for seasons of our life. . . . We may pause in the midst of meditation to let go of thoughts and reawaken our attention to the breath. We may pause by stepping out of daily life to go on a retreat or to spend time in nature or to take a sabbatical. . . . You might try it now: Stop reading and sit there, doing "no thing," and simply notice what you are experiencing.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Awakening self-compassion is often the greatest challenge people face on the spiritual path.”
Tara Brach, True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart
“I found myself praying: "May I love and accept myself just as I am.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Fear of being a flawed person lay at the root of my trance, and I had sacrificed many moments over the years in trying to prove my worth. Like the tiger Mohini, I inhabited a self-made prison that stopped me from living fully.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“On this sacred path of Radical Acceptance, rather than striving for perfection, we discover how to love ourselves into wholeness.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“We might begin by scanning our body . . . and then asking, "What is happening?" We might also ask, "What wants my attention right now?" or, "What is asking for acceptance?”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“The muscles used to make a smile actually send a biochemical message to our nervous system that it is safe to relax the flight of freeze response.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“Nothing is wrong—whatever is happening is just “real life.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“You have a unique body and mind, with a particular history and conditioning. No one can offer you a formula for navigating all situations and all states of mind. Only by listening inwardly in a fresh and open way will you discern at any given time what most serves your healing and freedom.”
Tara Brach, True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart
“What would it be like if I could accept life--accept this moment--exactly as it is?”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
“While the bodies of young children are usually relaxed and flexible, if experiences of fear are continuous over the years, chronic tightening happens. Our shoulders may become permanently knotted and raised, our head thrust forward, our back hunched, our chest sunken. Rather than a temporary reaction to danger, we develop a permanent suit of armor. We become, as Chogyam Trungpa puts it, “a bundle of tense muscles defending our existence.” We often don’t even recognize this armor because it feels like such a familiar part of who we are. But we can see it in others. And when we are meditating, we can feel it in ourselves—the tightness, the areas where we feel nothing.”
Tara Brach
“Observing desire without acting on it enlarges our freedom to choose how we live.”
Tara Brach, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
tags: desire

« previous 1

All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha Radical Acceptance
4,750 ratings
Open Preview
True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart True Refuge
395 ratings
Open Preview
Radical Acceptance: Guided Meditations Radical Acceptance
42 ratings